Interwoven: Fabrication.

Once the virtual model is finalized and I have all the surfaces flattened and laid out, the files are sent off to Wesco Laser to be cut from 14 (main body) and 7 (base) gauge 304 stainless steel. Now I get to try to turn this:

Pile of stainless wanting to be a sculpture.

Into a piece of public art.

Oh, and remember those tabs I talked about? Here they are, ready to be bent and employed to hold the whole works together.

1200 wee tabs, flat, wanting to be bent.

Making Terralogue Totems: Sidebar, Counselor.

Huh. Looks like I’ve forgotten to clue you in on just what the heck a “Terralogue Totem” is.

“ Terralogue Totems” are a set of sculptural designs based on the concept of the land speaking; these messages being symbolized through metal emblems. The designs are executed in three distinct formats: large sculptural Monoliths, Bike Racks, and Bollards.

 Maybe these little explanations we included on the plaques will help:

Making Terralogue Totems: Both Nitty and Gritty.

Getting into the meat of the fabrication now. Mostly a pretty straight-forward process and totally familiar to those of you who’ve followed along with other projects here on my blog. One hallmark of this particular design is the complication of using two different metals. Corten and stainless both rely on an oxide layer that develops on their surface to provide corrosion protection; Corten’s oxide just happens to be, well, rust-colored, while stainless steel’s is chalky gray. The only issue this presents is the rusty Corten oxide can stain the stainless (how the?), ruining the aesthetics of the piece. I elected to use internal supports (standoffs) to hold the two materials a quarter inch apart to prevent this.

Take a look at these photos and see if you can spot the standoffs.

Overcome.

“Overcome” in Little Rock, Arkansas

“Overcome” installed in Little Rock, Arkansas.

“We are not afraid, we are not afraid. We are not afraid today. Deep in my heart I do believe. We shall overcome someday.”

On September 25th, 1957, nine brave schoolchildren walked into Central High School and became symbols for a nation. They symbolized the righteous striving for equality and justice that continues to this day. I have chosen to refer symbolically to this event in my sculpture “Overcome” to honor both these students and what they represent to us all as a society and a culture. Nine shapes begin, caged by a lattice of injustice and segregation. They rise up and come together, and, leaning upon their collective strength, break their bonds to soar free. Each form is an arrow pointing skyward in continued aspiration for the greater good and an indication that more is yet to be done. 

Here’s some shots of the installation:

Below are some more photos from the fabrication process.

“Overcome”

“Overcome” installed in Little Rock, Arkansas.

“We are not afraid, we are not afraid. We are not afraid today. Deep in my heart I do believe. We shall overcome someday.”

On September 25th, 1957, nine brave schoolchildren walked into Central High School and became symbols for a nation. They symbolized the righteous striving for equality and justice that continues to this day. I have chosen to refer symbolically to this event in my sculpture “Overcome” to honor both these students and what they represent to us all as a society and a culture.Nine shapes begin, caged by a lattice of injustice and segregation. They rise up and come together, and, leaning upon their collective strength, break their bonds to soar free. Each form is an arrow pointing skyward in continued aspiration for the greater good and an indication that more is yet to be done. 

Here’s some shots of the installation. Hover over the image for a brief description.

Below are some more photos from the fabrication process.